"Inspectio Cordis": Trinity Sunday, May 26

We give witness to the Triune God by our way of life, by loving one another, as the divine Persons love each other in their divine communion of love.

By Fr. Thaddaeus Lancton, MIC

A gaze of the heart. Examining the depth of one’s heart.

There is no one way to translate the Latin title Inspectio Cordis, given to the collection of meditations for Sundays by the Founder of the Marians, St. Stanislaus Papczyński (1631-1701).

These meditations, published weekly on Fridays in preparation for the Sunday Mass, follow the style and purpose of our holy Father Founder. While his original text is worth reading, his examples and style can feel outdated to the modern reader. As his spiritual son, I will attempt my best to imitate his style and imitate his ministry of preaching to hearts.

The goal is to allow Jesus to gaze into your heart and teach you self-examination, leading you to a more fruitful reception of Holy Communion, where there is a true encounter of our hearts with His Sacred Heart – especially fitting during this period of National Eucharistic Revival.


Trinity Sunday – Cycle B
May 26, 2024

This Sunday’s Inspectio Cordis meditation uses the original meditations – in the quotation marks – from St. Stanislaus Papczyński. 

Before Holy Communion

1. “All power in heaven and on earth has been given to me.”    
“Therefore, authority in Heaven was given to Christ as a man so that, having entered [heaven] first, He would open it to those who believe… O how happy will you be in the future, if today you subject yourself entirely to this most powerful King, who is coming to you in the familiar form of bread…”

Authority evokes mixed emotions. Although we recognize our need for leaders, we fear their misuse of their power to our detriment. Many countries have constitutions that purposefully avoid placing all authority in the hands of one person.

But, with Jesus, we have nothing to fear in His use of such authority that humbles itself to come in the “familiar form of bread.” He nevertheless has compassion for our mistrust and slowness to “subject” ourselves entirely to Him. When we say "Amen" to Holy Communion, we agree to obey Him and observe His teaching that comes to us through the Church.

What emotions do you experience in relation to authority? How do you relate to Jesus as "Lord" who possesses "all power"? Where do you struggle to obey Him?

2. “Go, therefore, and make disciples…”
“Put, therefore, your hand to work with Christ, and cooperate with the gift of faith, that you may reach salvation.” 

Our salvation depends not only upon our own participation in Mass, confession of sins, and good works for the poor, but also upon our sharing in this work, namely, to "make disciples." Today, evangelization is an unwelcome activity, often associated with "proselytism." But the same Jesus whom we receive today commands us to do the same: to "go" after Mass and "make disciples."

Just as a fruitful marriage is manifest in the children born to the parents, so a fecund Church is visible by disciples who make more disciples through daily word and example.

We ourselves do not yet need to be perfect; we are called only to go and fulfill His command. He assures us that the harvest is indeed great, but the laborers are few. We have only to harvest.

How aware are you of this command to "make disciples" during the week? What actions can you perform to help teach others about Jesus and lead them to Him?

3. “…of all nations.”
“Behold, the most gracious Savior! Desiring that no man should perish, He sends the apostles to every country, province, kingdom, and empire, indeed to the whole world, with the task of showing them the way to salvation. Indeed, it is most certain that there simply is no part of the world, or of a nation, where the preaching of the Gospel would never come.”

The modern, secular mentality permits the Gospel to be spoken in churches or other places. But Jesus desires that we go forth, from the churches to every nook and cranny of culture, of government, of the world. He sends us to those places that perhaps might be most closed to the Gospel, for He desires that none be lost. This brings the fear of rejection.

But it is better to proclaim the Gospel and to be rejected, than to be silent and to lack obedience to our Lord’s commands. Often, we do not need to go "far" to see the "nations": this only requires manifesting our faith at work, or at stores, or in public.

Where are you afraid to manifest your faith? Where does Jesus call you to proclaim the Gospel and make disciples?

After Holy Communion

1. “Baptizing them in the name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Spirit.”
“Having considered the particular benefits of each Person of the Most Holy Trinity, give them thanks individually.”

As Christians, we identify quickly that we believe in “one God.” However, our faith is more nuanced, as is our experience of the one God. Saint Stanislaus encourages us to give thanks to each of the divine Persons individually, which reveals his desire that we develop a unique relationship with each of them. Because each of the Persons are united to each other, when we receive Jesus in Holy Communion, we also receive the Father and the Holy Spirit.

Our time of thanksgiving after Holy Communion enables us to experience not only Jesus, but also His Spirit and His Father. Perhaps you wonder how to distinguish in prayer between the three Persons, but that comes with time, as one enters the heart, where the Trinity dwells within us.

How often are you aware that you are a temple of the Trinity? When you receive Jesus, how do you also give thanks to the Father and the Spirit?

2. “Through whom we cry, ‘Abba, Father!’”
The way we experience the Holy Spirit is through His activity within our hearts, uniting us to the Son, so that, with Him, we cry out, “Abba, Father!” The Spirit does not lead us to Himself, but rather reveals the Father in Jesus. The sign that the Spirit dwells in us, then, is that we live with our gaze fixed upon the Father, as did Jesus. Our hearts are not enslaved by fear, even if we still experience that emotion like everybody else. But we know that we must suffer with Christ to be co-heirs with Him and so be glorified with Him.

We are confident as sons and daughters of God, who always remains Father, even amid the vicissitudes and difficulties of life. The sign that Holy Communion bears fruit is that we share the Spirit of Jesus, who orients our hearts and thoughts to the Father.

How often do you think of or cry out to God as Father during the day? In the face of what obstacles do you need the Spirit of adoption, to free you from fear?

3. “Did anything so great ever happen before? Was it ever heard of?”
Sometimes, we become accustomed to the miracle of the Eucharist and to the closeness of the Triune God. The Hebrews in the desert were the first to experience the closeness of God, who spoke to them primarily through Moses. But for us, the Father speaks to us directly through His Word and pours upon us His Spirit. The living God enters us personally through Holy Communion. We forget the privilege we have as Catholics to have our God so close to us, and we lose the awe and wonder so necessary to obey Him in our daily lives.

Perhaps it would behoove us to give thanks to the Trinity that the three divine Persons are so near to us and work to bring us to Heaven. Moreover, we give witness to the Triune God by our way of life, by loving one another, as the divine Persons love each other in their divine communion of love.

Where do you see God at work in your life? How do you experience awe and wonder before the closeness of the Triune God to you?

Next week: The Solemnity of the Most Holy Body and Blood of Christ / Corpus Christi.
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