Knowing Your Worth

By Marc Massery

Turn to any page of St. Faustina’s Diary, and you’ll find spiritual gems. Like this one:

I must not let myself get absorbed in the whirlwind of work, but take a break to look up to heaven (226)

Are you a workaholic? In this modern world, it’s tempting to want to equate your self-worth with your productivity, with the kind of job you have, or with how much money you make.  

Perhaps you frequently think that if you don’t work long hours, or if you don’t make enough money, or if you don’t get good enough grades, you’re not worthy of respect. But that’s just not true. While it’s important to work hard, we are not our jobs. We are children of God. The work we do is secondary to this fact. 

On the other hand, working hard and holiness go hand and hand. As Augustine said, “Pray as though everything depended on God. Work as though everything depended on you." But we need to be careful about where we derive our identity from. If we work hard for the wrong reasons (in order to get rich or as a way to prove our worth), we’ll get burnt out and resentful. When we understand God's unconditional love for us, though, we'll be motivated to work hard out of love for Him. When we work hard out of eagerness to please the Lord, He'll give us the grace to work even more diligently. 

So during your work day, don’t forget to reflect on who you ultimately are working for: your Father in Heaven. Only He determines your worth, and He says that you’re good, no matter what job you do, not matter how productive you may be, or no matter how much money you may make. 

Photo by Christin Hume on Unsplash

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